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Organized Symposia

Organized Symposium sessions highlight ideas or works-in-progress on a topic involving cooperative or competing efforts by two or more panelists. Symposia may involve panel discussions of prepared questions, debates, roundtable meetings, or other formats. Formal paper presentations are discouraged, nonetheless if such presentations are proposed, the organizer should explain how they will fit into a tightly coherent theme. At least half of the session time will be reserved for discussion among the panelists and between the panelists and the audience. Symposia may offer discussions of policy issues, research methods, emerging research results, teaching or outreach topics, issues in professional organization, or other matters.

Organized Symposia are concurrent sessions. Each concurrent session is 90 minutes in duration. Other concurrent sessions include, Selected Paper Sessions, Lightning Sessions, Organized Symposia, Track Sessions, Invited Paper Sessions, and Invited Case Study Sessions.

Schedule

Click on the below titles to jump to information. Updated April 16, 2019 but subject to change

Monday, July 22, 2019
Session Name Subject Code Time Period
Agricultural Labor - Issues and Solutions Household and Labor Economics 10:00-11:30 am
Perspectives on Global Food Security Food and Agricultural Policy Analysis & IAAE
Agricultural and Food Supply Chain Dynamics under
Changing Market and Policy Environments: Leveraging
New Data and Geographic Approaches to Explore
Employment Dynamics
Agribusiness Economics and Management  1:00-2:30 pm
The Role of Economic Theory in Empirical Analysis Resource and Environmental Policy Analysis & AERE
Reforming” Cost-Benefit Analysis for Regulation:
What are the Consequences?
Resource and Environmental Policy Analysis & AERE 2:45-4:15 pm
Economic Methods in Public Health at the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
CDC & Research Methods/Econometrics/Stats
Tuesday, July 23, 2019
Pollution, Health, and Environmental Policies: The Case of China Resource and Environmental Policy Analysis 10:00-11:30 am
Increasing Role of Economics in Agricultural Regulatory Decisions Food and Agricultural Policy Analysis
Pull Mechanisms and Prize Contests in the Field: Impacts
of AgResults and Other Innovation Incentives
International Development 1:00-2:30 pm
Food Waste and Loss: Global Perspectives and Local Challenges Food Safety and Nutrition
Info-Metrics for Modeling and Inference Research Methods/Econometrics/Stats
Strengthening Growth in Global Food/Feed Demand
with Challenging Policies: Implications for U.S. Crop Exports
Food and Agricultural Marketing 2:45-4:15 pm
Careers in Economics at the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC): The Path from Agricultural and
Environmental Economics Training and Practice to a
Career in Health Economics
CDC & Teaching, Communication, and Extension
Measuring the Global Burden of Animal Diseases ISESSAH & Research Methods/Econometrics/Stats
Topics in One Health, Zoonotic Diseases, & Biosecurity ISESSAH & Production Economics 4:45-6:15 pm
Economics of Managing Water in Australia Agribusiness Economics and Management & AARES

2019 Sessions

(Current as of March 12, 2019)

Increasing Role of Economics in Agricultural Regulatory Decisions

The session will provide an overview and perspectives on the changing role of economics in agricultural regulatory decisions today. The panel will also discuss where to look for information about forthcoming regulations and supporting documents that researchers/analysts may find useful.

Organizers:

  • Mary Bohman, Bureau of Economic Analysis
  • Parven Setia, APHIS/USDA        

Moderator:

  • Mary Bohman, Bureau of Economic Analysis

Panelist:

  • April Regonlinski, USDA-Food Safety and Inspection Service
  • Parven Setia, APHIS/USDA
  • Warren P. Preston, U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • Jason GrantVirginia Tech

Strengthening Growth in Global Food/Feed Demand with Challenging Policies: Implications for U.S. Crop Exports

Growth in global food/feed demand is projected for the coming decade which provides opportunities for exporting countries.  However, evolving trade policies may temper growth prospects for some nations.  In this symposium, we examine the potential attributes or impediments that are expected to affect demand for U.S. crops in the global marketplace. 

Organizer:

  • Linwood A. Hoffman, USDA-Economic Research Service
  • Jennifer K. Bond, USDA-Economic Research Service           

Moderator:

  • Seth D. Meyer, USDA-Economic Research Service

Discussant:

  • Patrick C. Westhoff, University of Missouri

Presentations:

  • Global Growth in Food/Feed Demand and Changing Domestic/Trade Policies: Background
    Presenter: James M. Hansen, USDA-Economic Research Service
  • Export Growth Potential for U.S. Feed Grains: Opportunities/Challenges
    Presenter: Thomas C. Capehart, USDA-Economic Research Service
  • Export Growth Potential for U.S. Soybeans/meal: Opportunities/Challenges      
    Presenters: Mark S. Ash, USDA-Economic Research Service and Jennifer Bond, USDA-Economic Research Service

Agricultural Labor - Issues and Solutions

In this session, we discuss several issues of emerging importance to farmers and policymakers concerned with access to agricultural labor. From healthcare, to minimum-wage reform, and changes to the H-2A program, researchers discuss on-going research using a variety of theoretical, and empirical, approaches. 

Panelist:

  • Ivan T. Kandilov, North Carolina State University
  • Jennifer E. Ifft, Cornell University
  • Alexandra E. Hill, University of California, Davis
  • Timothy J. Richards,  Arizona State University

Pollution, Health, and Environmental Policies: The Case of China

Unprecedented economic growth in China has caused serious environmental degradation and brought challenges for sustainable development. It is imperative to fully understand the adverse effects of environmental pollution on health and come up with feasible and effective energy/resource policies to lower the pollution levels. China’s experience in tackling environmental problems provides valuable lessons for other developing economies. The session aims to create a stage for general economists to exchange opinions on environmental issues and for environmental researchers to share their research outcomes.

Organizer:

  • Maoyong Fan, Ball State University

Moderator:

  • Maoyong Fan, Ball State University

Panelist:

  • Lunyu Xie Xie, Renmin University
  • Junji Xiao, University of Technology Sydney
  • Maoyong Fan, Ball State University

Presentations:

  • The impacts of air pollution on health: Evidence from Winter Heating Policy
    Presenter: Maoyong Fan, Ball State University
  • Battling Against Local and Global Air Pollutions by Household Energy Transition
    Presenter: Lunyu Xie Xie     Renmin University
  • The unintended environmental consequences of location-based policy: A quasi-natural experiment from Guangdong province in China
    Presenter: Junji Xiao, University of Technology Sydney

Pull Mechanisms and Prize Contests in the Field: Impacts of AgResults and Other Innovation Incentives

Pay-for-result competitions are often introduced by funders in agriculture and other sectors, offering "pull mechanisms" to reward results that are difficult to fund through traditional grants or contracts.  New incentives create demand for innovation beyond existing markets, pulling efforts towards the funder's criteria for prize payments.  This AAEA symposium will debate the strengths and limitations of pay-for-results approaches, focusing on impacts to date of the multi-donor $147 million AgResults program and other recent studies.

Organizer:

  • Tulika Narayan, Abt Associates

Panelist:

  • William A. Masters, Tufts University
  • Brian D. Wright, University of California, Berkeley
  • Justice A. Tambo, CABI Switzerland
  • David J. Spielman, International Food Policy Research Institute

Presentation:

  • Pull mechanisms and prize contests in the field: Impacts of AgResults and other innovation incentives
    Presenter: Tulika Narayan, Abt Associates

Food Waste and Loss: Global Perspectives and Local Challenges

The purpose of this proposed symposium is to discuss the linkages between food waste, food security, and environmental health. It includes both global perspectives and local analyses of potential solutions. This session aims to shed light on food waste-related issues faced both in industrialized countries where consumer food waste is dominant and developing regions where post-harvest losses are more important. The proposed symposium will start by addressing global patterns of food waste and the potential for mitigation of these losses to improve environmental outcomes to then shift to specific insights for reducing food waste across different stages of the supply chain.

Organizers:

  • Emiliano López Barrera, Purdue University
  • Thomas W. Hertel, Purdue University
  • Brian E. Roe, The Ohio State University

Moderator:

  • Jayson L. Lusk, Purdue University

Discussant:

  • Prabhu L. Pingali, Cornell University

Panelist:

  • Emiliano López Barrera, Purdue University                          
  • Thomas W. Hertel, Purdue University
  • Brian E. Roe, The Ohio State University                 
  • Danyi Qi, Louisiana State University             
  • Kathryn A. Boys, North Carolina State University              

Presentations:

  • Linking Food Availability and Waste in the Global Economy
    Presenter: Emiliano López Barrera, Purdue University
  • Putting Dollars to Waste: Estimating the Value of On-Farm Food Loss
    Presenter: Kathryn A. Boys, North Carolina State University
  • Household Food Waste and Home Livestock Production: Implications of Market Liberalization for Food Waste
    Presenter: Danyi Qi, PhD, Louisiana State University

Agricultural and Food Supply Chain Dynamics under Changing Market and Policy Environments: Leveraging New Data and Geographic Approaches to Explore Employment Dynamics

The food and agriculture supply chain has undergone remarkable evolution over the past three decades. This session highlights how researchers are utilizing relatively new or enriched economic data that enhance publicly available sets, all of which take unique approaches to study the evolution of geographic dynamics of upstream and downstream agricultural and food supply chains.  One panelist will present work on the locational determinants of food manufacturing across the U.S., exploring how farm-based direct sales and other indicators of local food systems may spillover into the birth rate of food manufacturing establishments. Another panelist will explore whether a relatively recent food market policy intervention, Cottage Food laws, may influence the birth rate, survival and/or employment growth of food manufacturers in those states where they have been enacted. Subsequent discussion will highlight future directions for the work with food manufacturing, retail and food-away-from home data including opportunities for work in agribusiness, rural development and geographic elements of industrial organization.

Organizer:

  • Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Colorado State University

Discussant:

  • Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Colorado State University

Moderator:

  • Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Colorado State University

Presentations:

  • The Geography of Foodies: Exploring the Influence of Place-Based Factors on the Relocalization and Employment Dynamics of Food Manufacturing Establishments
    Presenter: Sarah Low, University of Missouri
  • Do Cottage Food Laws Reduce Barriers to Entry for Food Manufacturers?
    Presenter: Jeffrey O’Hara, USDA - Agricultural Marketing Service
  • Economic Dynamism: Comparing urban and rural regions of the United States Author(s), including institutional affiliation and contact information
    Presenter: Brent M Hueth, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Perspectives on Global Food Security

Sponsored by Sections: International Association of Agricultural Economists (IAAE) and International Section

This session will feature four prominent panelists giving brief presentations on different features of the global food security landscape. Half the time will be dedicated to open discussion among the panelists and the audience about research directions as well as policy implications of recent research advances on global food security.

Organizer:

  • Christopher B. Barrett, Cornell University

Moderator:

  • Awudu Abdulai, University of Kiel

Panelist:

  • Annemie Maertens, University of Sussex
  • Ashok K. Mishra, Arizona State University
  • Matin Qaim, University of Goettingen
  • William J. Martin, International Food Policy Research Institute

Presentations:

  • Perspectives on Global Food Security
    Presenter: William J. Martin, International Food Policy Research Institute
  • Labor markets, social protection programs, and diet quality
    Presenter:  Ashok K. Mishra, Arizona State University
  • Complex household structures and food security
    Presenter: Annemie Maertens, University of Sussex

The Role of Economic Theory in Empirical Analysis

Sponsored by Sections: Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (AERE) and Land, Water and Environmental Economics (ENV)

This session explores the role of economic theory in empirical analysis. Each presenter will begin with some general comments on the role of theory in empirical analysis, and then present a research paper to illustrate how the theory informs the empirical analysis. The presentation would not focus on the theoretical model per se nor the empirical results, but rather on how the one informs the other, i.e., the link between the two.

Organizer:

  • Corbett Grainger, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • JunJie Wu, Oregon State University

Moderator:

  • JunJie Wu, Oregon State University

Presentations:

  • Combining Theoretical and Empirical Analysis to Evaluate Voluntary Environmental Programs with Spillover Effects
    Presenter: Kathleen Segerson, University of Connecticut
  • The Role of Theory for the Modern Empirical Researcher
    Presenter: David A. Keiser, Iowa State University
  • Quantifying Heat Waves and Their Effect on Economic Activity
    Presenter: Steve J. Miller, University of Minnesota

Reforming” Cost-Benefit Analysis for Regulation: What are the Consequences?

Sponsored by Sections: Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (AERE) and Land, Water and Environmental Economics (ENV)

This session reviews the history of C/B methods and applications, discusses alternative changes that might occur under the proposed reform, and assesses the consequences of these alternatives. This session will include a moderated discussion between the audience and the speakers.

Organizer:

  • Otto C. Doering, III, Purdue University
  • Leah H. Palm-Forster, University of Delaware

Moderator:

  • Otto C. Doering, III, Purdue University

Presentations:

  • A Short History of C/B Analysis and its Application
    Presenter: Wallace E. Tyner, Purdue University
  • What Are Some Suggested Changes in C/B and Their Consequences?
    Presenter: Cathy King, Cornell University
  • Do Current C/B Protocols Need Changing?
    Presenter: Ben Gramig, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Careers in Economics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): The path from Agricultural and Environmental Economics training and practice to a career in Health Economics

Sponsored by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This symposium is an opportunity for AAEA members to gain an understanding of career opportunities at CDC, the world’s largest health protection agency. Our panel includes four agricultural and/or environmental trained economists whose academic and professional paths have led to careers as health economists at CDC.  Each panel member will discuss their unique experiences leading to their current positions and a synopsis of their current research.  Each panel member participated in the Steven M. Teutsch Post-Doctoral Prevention Effectiveness (PE) Fellowship at CDC. Our panel will also be joined by the Dr. Adam Skelton, director of the PE Fellowship.

Organizer:

  • Gabrielle Miller, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Panelist:

  • Sergey V Sotnikov
  • Jamison Pike, Center for Disease Control (CDC)
  • Gabrielle Miller, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Mark L. Messonnier, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Adam Skelton, Center for Disease Control (CDC)

Economic Methods in Public Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Sponsored by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

We will discuss how applied economics methodologies can, and have, been used to generate essential information for public health decision makers. These topics include public health emergency, infectious diseases, vaccines, and injury prevention. This symposia will feature speakers with experience in public health, and they will describe how they have used applied economics methodologies to produce essential information for leadership. These methods are ultimately published and contribute to the field in public health economics. Discussants and attendants will discuss the specific challenges and types of questions relevant in public health.

Organizer:

  • Gabrielle Miller, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Panelist:

  • Gabrielle Miller, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Jamison Pike, Center for Disease Control (CDC)
  • Cristina Carias, Center for Disease Control (CDC)
  • Andres Leidner, Center for Disease Control (CDC)

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